Soc 1113: Introduction to Sociology

 

Welcome

Unit 1: The Sociological Perspective

Unit 2: Doing Research

Unit 3: Culture

Unit 4: Socialization

Exam #1

Unit 5: Social Interaction & Structure

Unit 6: Groups & Organizations

Unit 7: Deviance

Unit 8: Crime & Criminal Justice

Exam #2

Unit 9: Social Stratification

Unit 10: Global Stratification

Unit 11: Race & Ethnicity

Unit 12: Gender

Exam #3

Unit 13: Sexuality

Unit 14: Age and Aging

Unite 15: Families

Unit 16: Education

Exam #4

Unit 17: Religion

Unit 18: Economy & Work

Unit 19: Government and Politics

Unit 20: Health Care

Exam #5

Unit 21: Population & the Environment

Unit 22: Collective Behavior

Unit 23: Social Change

Exam #6

    Contact Information:
    Dr. Frank Elwell 
    Office Hours: Daily 8:00 to 11:00 
    email: felwell@rsu.edu
    Office: 202-B Prep Hall 
    Phone: 918.343.7851

    Required Texts:

    Margaret L. Anderson and Howard F. Taylor, Sociology: Understanding a Diverse Society, 4th edition.

    Consistent with the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis, I believe that in order to truly master a discipline you must first master its vocabulary. Accordingly, you will learn the vocabulary of the social sciences in this class. Your Study Guides will contain words that you must look up and memorize at one of the following websites:

    Elwell, Frank W., 1996/2008, Glossary of Social Sciences, Web Version.

    Elwell, Frank W., 1996/2008, Glossary of Social Sciences, Print Version. 

    Important Notice:
    E-mail communications with students will only be through the RSU student e-mail system. Students are responsible for checking their RSU student accounts on a regular basis.

    All Students are required to read, sign, and return the following Student MOU.

    Catalog Description:
    Foundations of social interaction including patterns of social structure, culture, socialization, family, education, religion, economic and political structures, primary relationships, social differentiation, organization, deviance, collective behavior, and social change. Scientific methods and sociological theorists will be discussed.

    Course Outline:
    You will study the units listed in the column on the left. Each unit name is a link to a Study Guide which connects to required and recommended readings, selected topic presentations, glossary terms to know, and other material useful in mastering the unit.

    Americans with Disabilities Act:
    Rogers State University is committed to providing students with disabilities equal access to educational programs and services. Any student who has a disability that he or she believes will require some form of academic accommodation must inform the professor of such need during or immediately following the first class attended. Before any educational accommodation can be provided, it is the responsibility of each student to prove eligibility for assistance by registering for services through Student Affairs. Students needing more information about Student Disability Services should contact Kendra Cagle, Coordinator of Student Disability Services at Rogers State University, 1701 W. Will Rogers Blvd., Claremore, OK 74017 or 918-343-6828.

Course Objectives:  

Course Goals

General Education Goal Supported:

How Evaluated

Students will demonstrate an understanding of sociocultural stability #6 Demonstrate knowledge of the history and functions of social institutions Exams consisting of multiple choice, fill-in-the-blanks, and essays; class discussions.
Students will demonstrate an understanding of sociocultural change #9 Demonstrate knowledge of the relationships among people and their physical and social environments Exams consisting of multiple choice, fill-in-the-blanks, and essays.
Students will demonstrate mastery of the vocabulary of the social sciences #6 Demonstrate knowledge of the history and functions of social institutions Exams consisting of multiple choice, fill-in-the-blanks, and essays; class discussions.
Students will develop an awareness of the social forces shaping their lives #9 Demonstrate knowledge of the relationships among people and their physical and social environments Exams consisting of multiple choice, fill-in-the-blanks, and essays; class discussions.

    Grading:
    There will be six examinations in this class, each worth 100 points. Each exam will cover three or four units. Exams will consist of multiple choice, fill-in-the-blanks (vocabulary words), and short-answer essays. To receive full credit on the essays you must do more than simply answer the question, you must demonstrate to me that you have actively read and mastered the material..

    All exams and written assignments are graded in accordance with the standards explained on the Grading Page.

    The first step in mastering any discipline is to master its vocabulary. Therefore, I have placed a great deal of emphasis in each exam on fill-in-the-blank questions. As part of each exam you will be given 10 to 20 definitions; you will be required to supply the correct glossary term for each. Each study guide contains a glossary you must master. Do so, and you will go a long way toward passing this course.

    Attendance Policy:
    It is important that you attend both physically and mentally. Studying the texts and the lecture/ presentations are key. Inappropriate classroom behavior will cause you to be dismissed from the class. 

    Make-up exams will be administered immediately after the scheduled final exam.

    Academic Integrity:
    By signing your name to a test or paper you are indicating that the work is yours and yours alone. Any academic cheating will result in failure of the course. "Plagiarism is the representation of the words or ideas of another as one’s own, including: direct quotation without both attribution and indication that the material is being directly quoted, e.g. quotation marks; paraphrase without attribution; paraphrase with or without attribution where the wording of the original remains substantially intact and is represented as the author’s own; expression in one’s own words, but without attribution, of ideas, arguments, lines of reasoning, facts, processes, or other products of the intellect where such material is learned from the work of another and is not part of the general fund of common knowledge" (Office of Academic Affairs, Rogers State University). 


Updated Continuously
İFrank Elwell Send comments to felwell at rsu.edu